Tyler Weitz
Designer
thumbnail.jpg

Styrofoam

If you've ever gotten a fountain drink from a mall food court or at an amusement park, you probably recognize the design of two blue strokes wrapped around the cup—the wider strokes a lighter aqua blue, the skinnier ones a dark shade that borders on the side of purple.

Growing up with this design everywhere, I had to find out what it was all about; After some internet snooping, I found that Gina Ekiss was behind this iconic design. 

Ekiss had worked at the Springfield plant of the Sweetheart Cup Company, the distributor of the design. In 1989, the company held an internal contest to create a new stock image, and Ekiss entered the image that would become "Jazz."

The rest is history. Products featuring Ekiss's design hit the market in 1992. Solo purchased Sweetheart in 2004, leading to many classifying the cups as "Solo Jazz" cups. The design became an emblem of '90s culture, and today has been repurposed as a pattern used on shirts, nail art and even cars.

This art project is my nod to Ekiss' work and all the sugary, carbonated drinks I consumed as a child.

Styrofoam

If you've ever gotten a fountain drink from a mall food court or at an amusement park, you probably recognize the design of two blue strokes wrapped around the cup—the wider strokes a lighter aqua blue, the skinnier ones a dark shade that borders on the side of purple.

Growing up with this design everywhere, I had to find out what it was all about; After some internet snooping, I found that Gina Ekiss was behind this iconic design. 

Ekiss had worked at the Springfield plant of the Sweetheart Cup Company, the distributor of the design. In 1989, the company held an internal contest to create a new stock image, and Ekiss entered the image that would become "Jazz."

The rest is history. Products featuring Ekiss's design hit the market in 1992. Solo purchased Sweetheart in 2004, leading to many classifying the cups as "Solo Jazz" cups. The design became an emblem of '90s culture, and today has been repurposed as a pattern used on shirts, nail art and even cars.

This art project is my nod to Ekiss' work and all the sugary, carbonated drinks I consumed as a child.


c4d_styrofoam_colors_01.gif